Impression Sunrise

Impression Sunrise

Impression Sunrise, 1873, Claude Monet, France, 48cm × 63cm, Marmond Museum

This painting depicts the sunrise through the mist over the Port of Le Havre at the port of Aubert. The brush strokes of the direct stamp point depict the unclear background of the morning fog, the wide range of colors that give the water infinite brightness and are not accurately portrayed to make those boats faintly visible. A true depiction of the light and color of the French seaport city at sunrise which gives the artist a visual impression. Because it broke through the shackles of traditional painting, one critic borrowed the title of the painting, ridiculed a group of young painters who wanted to innovate and create "impressionism" represented by Monet. This painting was exhibited at the first joint exhibition of Impressionists who opened on March 25, 1874, and is the most typical of Monet's paintings.

Monet is undoubtedly a creative genius in visual observation, and he is good at discovering something never seen before in light and color interrelationships. He focused all his attention on light and color, thus finding the most suitable form for expressing the difference in lightness between light and color. Claude Monet abstracts this variability in lightness and color from the various other elements of the drawing and refers to the unreachable height.

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